Music‎ > ‎

Duo

EN | PT

The violoncellist Ulrich Mitzlaff, and the double bassist Miguel Leiria Pereira present ten free improvised musical pieces recorded in 2004 where the language and aesthetics have some inspiration on ideas explored by several 20th century composers. Besides these idiomatic references, the duo also explores a more introspective, and non-idiomatic side, resulting on a music that is fruit of discussions on images and musical forms. The process can be described as a kind of real time composition, where the exploration of the timbre, dynamics, and expressivity are issues on focus.

The Musical Pieces' Concept
The “Duo” musical proposal is divided in three groups of improvised pieces. The first group is also divided in two parts. In Perseguição and Insects we have images that were discussed by the musicians and interpreted under their own subjectivity. In Machine and Minimal in certain way we have the opposite. The music was totally free improvised and later after analysis had a name. Therefore, on this group we have the a priori and a posteriori ideas mixed with suggested images that on both ways are always about imaginary objects. On the second group, in Koi, Stones, and Palha d’Aço there is a direct interaction of the musicians with real objects. In Koi we begun to feed koi carps and tried to interact with their sound, the water’s sound, and the fish visual choreography was something that also became a musical inspiration. Later, more koi sounds were recorded and a musical arrangement was made over the first take. In Stones and Palha d’Aço, the musicians interact in realtime with objects. What connects this group experiences is the fact of interacting with something external to our musical instruments. On the third group, the Intermezzos I, II, and III, as suggested by its own name, they connect the pieces within the groups explained before. Each intermezzo explores distinct languages and expression forms. Only two aspects unify them, the timbre as all are pizzicato played, and the image they represent that we leave open to our listener’s imagination.

Audio

2004